Clinic

Lifeline Clinic

The N/a’an ku sê Lifeline Clinic in Epukiro, in the remote eastern region of Omaheke in Namibia, is dedicated to the health and welfare of the San community. The Lifeline Clinic provides free primary healthcare to almost 3,500 patients every year. Of these 40% are children and babies, and more than 90% are San. As well as examining and treating patients at the clinic and at our outreach sites, we transport and admit patients in urgent need of medical attention to the nearest hospital in Gobabis, 120km away.

TB Program

With the support of STOP TB partnership, we run a TB program. Recent research at our clinic has shown that the San have a 15 times higher risk of TB than other tribes in Omaheke. Diagnosis is often delayed due to poor access to healthcare. They are more likely to interrupt treatment and to die from TB. Indeed, many San deaths are related to TB. The San live in remote areas and have considerable difficulty accessing healthcare. The region of Omaheke in Namibia covers an area of 85000km2. There is only one hospital and eleven nurse-led state clinics in this region. Our aim is to significantly expand the outreach activities of our clinic to proactively address TB in the area. In this way we are able to diagnose more patients, start more TB treatment, offer patient education, reduce treatment default rates and overall reduce TB deaths in the San.

The Lifeline Clinic receives no government funding and is reliant on the generosity of donors and medical volunteers to continue our lifesaving work.
Support the Lifeline Clinic today

With the support of vital investors and donors, including Jan Verburg and Burgland Charitas, Marlice and Rudie van Vuuren and their friend Chris Heunis opened the N/a’an ku sê Lifeline Clinic at Epukiro, east Namibia, in 2003.

The clinic was built after the need for a basic but comprehensive health service became apparent following the tragic and unnecessary death of a San child.

Our healthcare provision is focused on the local San community in this remote area. The Lifeline Clinic is entirely funded by voluntary donations and run by a full-time nurse and two doctors. Further support is provided by short-term foreign volunteers.

Volunteer programme
Projects

Lifeline Clinic Clinical Services

Providing healthcare to San communities.

Lifeline Clinic Tuberculosis (TB) Research

Thanks to the support from TB REACH, the Lifeline Clinic is conducting crucial TB research throughout the region.

Medisan

The Medisan videos show health education in the Ju/’hoansi language with English subtitles. They cover the most urgent health concerns.

San Adults continuing Education

N/a’an ku sê not only provides a source of employment, accommodation and healthcare to several San families, but develops future earning capabilities.